The Creation Wiki is made available by the NW Creation Network
Watch monthly live webcast - Like us on Facebook - Subscribe on YouTube

Plant physiology

From CreationWiki, the encyclopedia of creation science
Jump to: navigation, search

Photosynthesis

Transpiration

Transpiration is the process by which moisture is carried through plants from roots to small pores on the underside of leaves, where it changes to vapor and is released to the atmosphere. Transpiration is essentially evaporation of water from plant leaves. It is estimated that about 10 percent of the moisture found in the atmosphere is released by plants through transpiration. During a growing season, a leaf will transpire many times more water than its own weight. A large oak tree can transpire 40,000 gallons (151,000 liters) per year.[1]

The amount of water that plants transpire varies greatly geographically and over time. There are a number of factors that determine transpiration rates:

  • Temperature: Transpiration rates go up as the temperature goes up, especially during the growing season, when the air is warmer due to stronger sunlight and warmer air masses.
  • Relative humidity: As the relative humidity of the air surrounding the plant rises the transpiration rate falls. It is easier for water to evaporate into dryer air than into more saturated air.
  • Wind and air movement: Increased movement of the air around a plant will result in a higher transpiration rate.
  • Soil-moisture availability: When moisture is lacking, plants can begin to senesce (premature ageing, which can result in leaf loss) and transpire less water.
  • Type of plant: Plants transpire water at different rates. Some plants which grow in arid regions, such as cacti and succulents, conserve precious water by transpiring less water than other plants.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Summary of the Water Cycle U.S. Geological Survey. Updated Apr 142010