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Gaviacetus

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Gaviacetus
Scientific Classification

[1]

Species

Gaviacetus is a primitive cetacean that assumed by evolutionists to be lived approximately 45 million years ago. Its name comes from the radicals 'Gavia', loon, and 'cetus' whale. Although often represented as having small hind limbs,[2] this is an inference by evolutionists from the general progression of other fossil species towards limb loss; the only postcranial remains found for Gaviacetus itself were a rib and two vertebrae.[3] The Gaviacetus was originally classified by Gingerich et al. as belonging to the genus Protocetidae in 1995 and after that, being described by Bajpai and Thewissen in 1998 as belonging to the genre Basilosauridae, but the genre was restored to Protocetidae in the paper of Geisler et al.[4]

At least three popular science books misspell this genus as Gaviocetus.[2][5][6]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Gaviacetus". http://www.palaeocritti.com/by-group/eutheria/cetacea/archaeoceti/gaviacetus. Retrieved September 3, 2012. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Zimmer, Carl (1998). At the Water's Edge. 
  3. Gingerich, Philip D.; Arif, Muhammad; Clyde, William C. (1995). "New Archaeocetes (Mammalia, Cetacea) from the Middle Eocene Domanda formation of the Sulaiman range, Pun Jab (Pakistan)". Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology (The University of Michigan) 29 (11): 291-330. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/48650. 
  4. Geisler, Jonathan H.; Sanders, Albert E.; Luo, Zhe-Xi (July 2005). "A New Protocetid Whale (Cetacea: Archaeoceti) from the Late Middle Eocene of South Carolina". American Museum Novitates (New York: American Museum of Natural History) (3480). ISSN 003-0082. http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/dspace/bitstream/handle/2246/5671/N3480.pdf?sequence=1. 
  5. Prothero, Donald R (2007). Evolution: What the Fossils Say and Why it Matters. New York/Chichester: Columbia University Press. ISBN 978-0-231-13962-5. 
  6. Dawkins, Richard (2009). The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution. Free Press. ISBN 1-41659478-7. 

External Link

See Also